Lebret Public Elementary School (Not Residential School)

Not all Indigenous children were required to attend the Indian Residential School in Lebret - in "Relevant Resources" (listed below), James Tyman serves as an example of a visibly Indigenous Metis boy who was subjected to continual racism from his peers at the public elementary school in Lebret.

Date Explaination
The date is indicative of the beginning of the Sixties Scoop.
Result
Experiences of racism compounded the difficulties caused by pre-existing issues of identity deriving from Tyman's status as an adopted child. Tyman was not provided with the social supports necessary to navigate constant exposure to ethnic discrimination and social rejection. A lack of acceptance and understanding from peers and authority figures (teachers, principal and parents) served to demotivate Tyman in terms of displaying pro-social behaviour, and eventually solidified a pattern of deviancy. Without the necessary social supports, these patterns of deviancy escalated until he was incarcerated.
Rural or Urban
urban
Start Date
1960-00-00
Sub Event
Adoption of Indigenous Children by Non-Indigenous Parents
Community