"Determined to Burn off the Entire Country": Prospectors, Caribou, and the Denesuliné in Northern Saskatchewan, 1900-1940

From the Author's Abstract: "If winter and summer in southern Saskatchewan are known for snow and dust respectively, in the north ice and fire are the harbingers of these very separate seasons. The historic frequency and extent of fires in the boreal forest has shaped plant communities and, as a result, animal and human communities in the area as well; but while modern fire suppression efforts readily and actively acknowledge that fire is an integral part of the northern forest, concern over human safety, individual property, and forest resources, namely timber for pulp and lumber, has caused the province to aggressively combat, or at least carefully managed and monitor, many fires in the northern forest. Gulig discusses more on the effects of the fires and how the province is keeping an eye on the fires to prevent more damage."

Author
Gulig, Anthony G.
Primary Resource
Secondary
Publication Date
2002
Publication Information

Gulig, Anthony. "Determined to Burn off the Entire Country": Prospectors, Caribou, and the Denesuliné in Northern Saskatchewan, 1900-1940." American Indian Quarterly 26, no. 3 (2002): 335-59.