Compulsory Enfranchisement Introduced

This legislation was introduced in 1920, modified in 1922 and re-enacted in 1933. Introduced in March 1920, Bill 14 allowed for an Aboriginal person to be enfranchised without consent if a report written by an individual appointed by the superintendent general said they possessed the "necessary qualifications."

Leads

PAC, RG-10, 6809, file 470-2-3 Pt. 6, Scott to Meighen, January 28, 1920.

Result
This bill afforded government officials the ability to enfranchise Aboriginal peoples without their consent, thereby eliminating their inherent status and access to treaty rights. This was an attempt to quicken the assimilation process, thereby reducing the what the Government called the "Indian problem." enfranchisement at this time stripped the government of their fiduciary responsibilities associated with the fulfillment of treaty obligations. Enfranchisement was also a means of enacting government discipline, punishing and silencing Aboriginal peoples who were vocal in their opposition of government policy - removing status was ultimately a way in which the government could carry out threats against Aboriginal peoples as a way to inhibit political opposition.
Rural or Urban
rural
Start Date
1920-03-00
Community
Documents
File
File Description
An Act to Amend the Indian Act, Prefix to Statutes: 10-11 George V, Chapt. 50
File
File Description
An Act to Amend the Indian Act, Prefix to Statutes: 10-11 George V, Chapt. 50
File
File Description
Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906: An Act respecting Indians, Chapt. 81